The House Next Door – Review

Currently on Loan from the Library:

The Queen by: Steven James

Revenge Wears Prada by: Lauren Weisberger

The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England by: Ian Morimer

Kraken by: China Mieville

Reamde by: Neal Stephenson

Other Books I’m Reading:

Riotous Assembly by: Tom Sharpe

Don’t Kiss with your Mouth Full by: Henry P. Mahone

Anathem by: Neal Stephenson

I always appreciate it when an author steps away from what they normally write to try something different. I think most authors have more stories to tell then the ones they publish. When an audience becomes used to a certain kind of book from a writer of course they want more of that sort of book. But I like the glances down the road not taken. Even if they aren’t totally successful.

The House Next Door by Anne Rivers Siddons is one of those steps away from the normal. Siddons, who has long been known for lush books about Southern life and culture, actually doesn’t step too far from her normal realm here. The book is still set in the south, and still displays many of the usual Siddons motifs. However, The House Next Door is a psychological thriller.

Colquitt Kennedy and her husband Walter have a nice quiet middle class life, until someone starts to build a house on the property next to theirs. Colquitt is actually a little put out that someone is building next door, until she meets and befriends the young architect Kim Dougherty. It’s Kim’s first house. He’s excited, and desperate that everyone should recognize his special genius. Which of course Colquitt does.

Then things turn dark. There are accidents, and unexplained incidences connected with the house. People seem to have personality changes when they are in the house or become depressed. Leading Colquitt and eventually Walter to believe that the house is evil. Or possibly haunted. Of course you can’t have a haunted house on the block killing people, so Colquitt and Walter decide to take care of business.

Here is the thing that keeps this book from being just another haunted house story. Colquitt is the first person narrator of the story. So it’s not always clear if she is telling the absolute truth about things. The truth as she sees it. Or the truth as she’s been influenced to see it by the house. She could be suffering from a deep and scary form of psychopathy, or she could be dealing with a very evil house. It’s never really made clear either way. Although I have an opinion given the last ten pages.

The House Next Door was written in the late 1970’s. Younger reader may find some of it a bit dated. I don’t think it detracts from the book. Sensitive readers should be aware there is one scene containing a mildly graphic description of a miscarriage. On the whole though it is not a gory book.

If you do decide to read The House Next Door clear some time in your schedule. I read it in one sitting the first time. I was up until 3 a.m. It gives the phrase architectural nightmare a whole different meaning.

Favorite Scene: Kim comes by for a drink the first time.

Favorite Quote: “If we find that all our efforts have failed and someone buys the house, we shall set fire to it and burn it down. We will to this at night, before it is occupied. In another time they would have plowed the charred ground and sowed it with salt.

If it should come to that, I do not think we will be punished.

I do not think we will be alive long enough. “

Enjoyability: Five stars.

Where to read this book: Probably not at night alone in a house. I read it at night, but I was not alone.

Further reading: I have a whole pile of books. I should probably just start at the top and work down.

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Posted on September 11, 2013, in books, Fiction, fun, Reading, review and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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